It Pays to Be Herr Kaiser Germans With Noble-Sounding Surnames More Often Work as Managers Than as Employees - HEC Paris - École des hautes études commerciales de Paris Access content directly
Journal Articles Psychological Science Year : 2013

It Pays to Be Herr Kaiser Germans With Noble-Sounding Surnames More Often Work as Managers Than as Employees

Abstract

In the field study reported here (N = 222,924), we found that Germans with noble-sounding surnames, such as Kaiser ("emperor"), König ("king"), and Fürst ("prince"), more frequently hold managerial positions than Germans with last names that either refer to common everyday occupations, such as Koch ("cook"), Bauer ("farmer"), and Becker/Bäcker ("baker"), or do not refer to any social role. This phenomenon occurs despite the fact that noble-sounding surnames never indicated that the person actually held a noble title. Because of basic properties of associative cognition, the status linked to a name may spill over to its bearer and influence his or her occupational outcomes.
No file

Dates and versions

hal-00980265 , version 1 (17-04-2014)

Identifiers

Cite

Raphael Silberzahn, Eric Luis Uhlmann. It Pays to Be Herr Kaiser Germans With Noble-Sounding Surnames More Often Work as Managers Than as Employees. Psychological Science, 2013, 24 (12), pp.2437-2444. ⟨10.1177/0956797613494851⟩. ⟨hal-00980265⟩

Collections

HEC CNRS
129 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook X LinkedIn More